Premenstrual syndrome (PMS) and PMDD

For these and other terms, see the Alphabet of bioZhena at /2007/11/28/the-alphabet-of-biozhena/

The bioZhena technology is useful beyond the fertility-tracking primary purposes

(i.e., beyond aiding conception and aiding birth control).

“PMS is one of the most common disorders treated by reproductive endocrinologists”

The Book of Urizen

PMS is a combination of emotional, physical, psychological, and mood disturbances that occur after ovulation and normally end with the onset of the menstrual flow. The symptoms include abdominal bloating, breast tenderness, headache, fatigue, irritability, anxiety, and depression.

Why is this serious?

At least 30% of menstruating women experience distressing premenstrual symptoms that compel them to seek their doctor’s help, and as many as 60% to 75% of women experience some of the PMS symptoms. Of these, about 2% to 10% experience severe problems and functional impairment, which is called the premenstrual dysphoric disorder or PMDD.

According to the PMS expert, Dr. Joseph Mortola, PMS is one of the most common disorders treated by reproductive endocrinologists. Diagnosis depends on prospective recording of symptoms, and a documented symptom-free interval during the follicular (premenstrual) phase of the menstrual cycle.

PMS/PMDD is an entity that must be distinguished from (and treated differently than) anxiety disorders and depression. However, the research is still in its infancy. According to Dr. Mortola, the realization of the effectiveness of certain new drugs such as the GnRH analogs combined with estrogen/progestin replacement therapy is an important area for future research, where the optimal dosages of replacement therapy have yet to be determined. This is similar to the situation with perimenopausal HRT.

Therapeutic treatment of PMDD, in particular, requires to ascertain whether the symptoms are unique to the premenstrual phase or not. This is to differentiate PMDD from clinical depression, for proper treatment. Current medical practice (both primary care and particularly psychiatry, which steps in afterward in some of the difficult cases) utilizes nothing better than the discredited calendar-based rhythm method rather than a rigorous technique for ovulation detection.

Needed: Differential diagnosis

Effective medical help for female patients requires differential diagnosis, for which the recorded symptoms must be correlated with the progress of the menstrual cycle (folliculogenesis). This correlation has not been available up to now and the diagnostician can only guess at how the scores of symptoms relate to the course of the menstrual cycle (folliculogenesis).

Differential diagnosis is essential because a clinical study found that more than 75% of patients presenting with the complaints of PMS had another condition that either could account for the symptoms or that required correction before an accurate diagnosis of PMS could be made [Mortola, JF: “Issues in the diagnosis and research of premenstrual syndrome”, Clin. Obstet. Gynecol. 35:587-598, 1992].

The physician user of our OvulographTM technology will have the benefit of working with accurate and comprehensive data on each patient’s menstrual cycle history, and will be in a better position to provide effective help.

How OvulographTM will help

Two examples of ovulographic correlation of symptoms (symptometric data, here the COPE scores) and folliculogenesis (Ovulona probe readings) can be seen below and – along with the answer to What is the meaning of symptometric data – in the document on the accompanying Page “What is symptometric?” at https://biozhena.wordpress.com/what-is-symptometric/.

Ovulographic correlation of folliculogenesis and symptometric data – click to open a clear PDF version of the image

Ovulographic Correlation of Folliculogenesis and Symptometric Data

In the first example, the cumulative COPE score rises on day 13, which is 3 days before ovulation (day 16), and we note that this is a case of an irregular cycle with a delayed ovulation. In the second example, the COPE score rises on day 17, which is 2 days after the day of ovulation (day 15).

We observe that, in the first example, in the absence of the Ovulona probe data, the “traditional” method of counting back 14 days from the first day of menstrual bleeding (namely, to day 12) would lead to the wrong conclusion that the score rise on day 13 is post-ovulatory.

Only the second example (documented post-ovulation rise of the COPE score) appears to be a case of PMS.

“Psychiatric instruments” will become women’s healthcare tools

COPE score refers to the well known “psychiatric instrument”, the Calendar of Premenstrual Experiences (COPE), described in a paper by Beck LE, Gevirtz R, Mortola JF: “The predictive value of psychosocial stress on symptom severity in premenstrual syndrome”, Psychosom. Med. 52:536, 1990.

The bioZhena technology should have a positive effect in the PMS/PMDD arena.

Two key words are pertinent in this context, namely psychoneuroendocrinology (or even psycho-neuro-immuno-endocrinology) and the much shorter psychosomatic, as in psychosomatic medicine.

See also “On the importance of symptometric monitoring” https://biozhena.wordpress.com/about/about-biozhena-tech-pitch/importance-of-symptometry/ .

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3 Responses to “Premenstrual syndrome (PMS) and PMDD”

  1. Far more than a tool for reproductive management « bioZhena’s Weblog Says:

    […] For an illustration, refer to Premenstrual syndrome (PMS) and PMDD […]

  2. Exactly Why Migraines Strike? Says:

    What could be the Basic Cause of your Migraine Headache?…

    A migraine headache might assault everywhere, anytime. The headache has particular triggering brings about. Lots of medical researches are with the view that Serotonin plays an substantial element in triggering migraines……

  3. The Ovulona is not another ovulation kit, my dear | bioZhena's Weblog Says:

    […] gynecologist, your family doctor – or your psychiatrist if you suffer badly with PMS (diagnosed as PMDD) – does not have the benefit of the folliculogenesis cyclic profiles stored in the Ovulona […]

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