Archive for the ‘diagnosis’ Category

Premenstrual syndrome (PMS) and PMDD

December 17, 2007

For these and other terms, see the Alphabet of bioZhena at /2007/11/28/the-alphabet-of-biozhena/

The bioZhena technology is useful beyond the fertility-tracking primary purposes

(i.e., beyond aiding conception and aiding birth control).

“PMS is one of the most common disorders treated by reproductive endocrinologists”

The Book of Urizen

PMS is a combination of emotional, physical, psychological, and mood disturbances that occur after ovulation and normally end with the onset of the menstrual flow. The symptoms include abdominal bloating, breast tenderness, headache, fatigue, irritability, anxiety, and depression.

Why is this serious?

At least 30% of menstruating women experience distressing premenstrual symptoms that compel them to seek their doctor’s help, and as many as 60% to 75% of women experience some of the PMS symptoms. Of these, about 2% to 10% experience severe problems and functional impairment, which is called the premenstrual dysphoric disorder or PMDD.

According to the PMS expert, Dr. Joseph Mortola, PMS is one of the most common disorders treated by reproductive endocrinologists. Diagnosis depends on prospective recording of symptoms, and a documented symptom-free interval during the follicular (premenstrual) phase of the menstrual cycle.

PMS/PMDD is an entity that must be distinguished from (and treated differently than) anxiety disorders and depression. However, the research is still in its infancy. According to Dr. Mortola, the realization of the effectiveness of certain new drugs such as the GnRH analogs combined with estrogen/progestin replacement therapy is an important area for future research, where the optimal dosages of replacement therapy have yet to be determined. This is similar to the situation with perimenopausal HRT.

Therapeutic treatment of PMDD requires to ascertain whether the symptoms are unique to the premenstrual (post-ovulation) phase or not. This is to differentiate PMDD from clinical depression, for proper treatment. Current medical practice (both primary care and particularly psychiatry, which steps in afterward in some of the difficult cases) utilizes nothing better than the discredited calendar-based rhythm method rather than a rigorous technique for ovulation detection.

Needed: Differential diagnosis

Effective medical help for female patients requires differential diagnosis, for which the recorded symptoms must be correlated with the progress of the menstrual cycle (folliculogenesis). This correlation has not been available up to now and the diagnostician can only guess at how the scores of symptoms relate to the course of the menstrual cycle (folliculogenesis).

Differential diagnosis is essential because a clinical study found that more than 75% of patients presenting with the complaints of PMS had another condition that either could account for the symptoms or that required correction before an accurate diagnosis of PMS could be made [Mortola, JF: “Issues in the diagnosis and research of premenstrual syndrome”, Clin. Obstet. Gynecol. 35:587-598, 1992].

The physician user of our OvulographTM technology will have the benefit of working with accurate and comprehensive data on each patient’s menstrual cycle history, and will be in a better position to provide effective help.

How OvulographTM will help

Two examples of ovulographic correlation of symptoms (symptometric data, here the COPE scores) and folliculogenesis (Ovulona probe readings) can be seen below and – along with the answer to What is the meaning of symptometric data – in the document on the accompanying Page “What is symptometric?” at https://biozhena.wordpress.com/what-is-symptometric/.

Ovulographic correlation of folliculogenesis and symptometric data – click to open a clear PDF version of the image

Ovulographic Correlation of Folliculogenesis and Symptometric Data

In the first example, the cumulative COPE score rises on day 13, which is 3 days before ovulation (day 16), and we note that this is a case of an irregular cycle with a delayed ovulation. In the second example, the COPE score rises on day 17, which is 2 days after the day of ovulation (day 15).

We observe that, in the first example, in the absence of the Ovulona probe data, the “traditional” method of counting back 14 days from the first day of menstrual bleeding (namely, to day 12) would lead to the wrong conclusion that the score rise on day 13 is post-ovulatory.

Only the second example (documented post-ovulation rise of the COPE score) appears to be a case of PMS.

“Psychiatric instruments” will become women’s healthcare tools

COPE score refers to the well known “psychiatric instrument”, the Calendar of Premenstrual Experiences (COPE), described in a paper by Beck LE, Gevirtz R, Mortola JF: “The predictive value of psychosocial stress on symptom severity in premenstrual syndrome”, Psychosom. Med. 52:536, 1990.

The bioZhena technology should have a positive effect in the PMS/PMDD arena.

Two key words are pertinent in this context, namely psychoneuroendocrinology (or even psycho-neuro-immuno-endocrinology) and the much shorter psychosomatic, as in psychosomatic medicine.

See also “On the importance of symptometric monitoring” https://biozhena.wordpress.com/about/about-biozhena-tech-pitch/importance-of-symptometry/ .

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Cervix uteri and seven or eight related things

December 16, 2007

For these and other terms, see the Alphabet of bioZhena at /2007/11/28/the-alphabet-of-biozhena/

Rerum Naturare Feminina. A Woman’s Natural Thing. In the lingua franca of the ancients.

The reader of this bioZhena’s Weblog article will or should be well aware that a woman’s menstrual cycle lengths are quite variable, as is the timing of her ovulation within those menstrual cycles. For evidence of this variability, see another blog post at https://biozhena.wordpress.com/2010/03/07/variability-of-menstrual-cycles-and-of-ovulation-timing/ (opens in new tab/window). Our focus on the cervix uteri is clarified below in this article.

Cervix:

The narrow lower part of the uterus (womb), with an opening that connects the uterus to the vagina. It contains special glands called the crypts that produce mucus, which helps to keep bacteria (and other microbes, including sperm for most of the cycle) out of the uterus and beyond. Sometimes called the neck of the womb, it protrudes into the vagina. The region around the cervical protrusion is known as the vaginal fornix. The sanitary vaginal tampon is inserted so as to reach into the posterior fornix. Likewise the bioZhena sensor. As simple as that.

The cervix is the gateway to the uterus and has a lot of important and challenging roles. It must allow the passage of either sperm (or penis, in some species) at copulation, prevent the entrance of microorganisms before and particularly during pregnancy, and expel the neonate and placenta at parturition (birth). It is a muscular tube that has a very dynamic role in both the menstrual cycle and in forming a tight seal during pregnancy, but opening to form a broad passageway at birth. The multitude of physiological roles of this gateway has caused it to become an important element or focus of the bioZhena technology.

Cervical mucus:

The fluid secreted by the inner walls of the cervical canal and exuded by the cervix. The amount and the properties of the fluid change depending on the phase of the menstrual cycle, e.g., from practically nonexistent during the so-called dry days early in the cycle to the relatively copious amounts of clear slippery fluid during the fertile days.

Cervical mucus is essential for the ability of the sperm to function properly: sperm survival and sperm transport within the woman’s reproductive system are critically dependent upon the presence of a healthy mucus.

To quote a noted expert, Professor Erik Odeblad: “Complications arising from the use of the Pill are very frequent. Infertility after its use for 7-15 years is a very serious problem. S crypts are very sensitive to normal and cyclical stimulation by natural oestrogens, and the Pill causes atrophy of these crypts. Fertility is impaired since the movement of sperm cells up the canal is reduced. Treatment is difficult.” He also wrote: “After 3 to 15 months of contraceptive pill use, there is a greater loss of the S crypt cells than can be replaced … A pregnancy rejuvenates the cervix by 2-3 years, but for each year the Pill is taken, the cervix ages by an extra year.” Web reference:http://www.billings-ovulation-method.org.au/act/pill.html .

Cervical mucus method:

A method of determining a woman’s fertility by observing changes in her cervical mucus. The Billings ovulation method and the Creighton model ovulation method are both cervical mucus methods.

Cervical palpation:

Feeling the cervix with the middle finger of the thus trained woman-user of FAM or NFP to determine cervical position. This is not a widely used procedure, and is not involved in the Billings and Creighton ovulation methods.

Cervical position:

Three facets of the cervix (its height, softness and the size of its opening, the cervical os) assessed for fertility significance by specially trained users of this method of NFP or FAM. Not many of those around…

Colposcope:

A viewing instrument with a bright light and magnifying lens that is used to examine the vagina and cervix stained with special solutions. Colposcopy: Examination of the vaginal and cervical epithelia by means of a colposcope. [Greek kolpos, vagina, womb + -scopy, suffix that signifies viewing; seeing; observation: as in microscopy. From Greek -skopi, from skopein, to see.] Colposcopy is the diagnostic procedure to evaluate patients whose Pap smear screening produced abnormal cytological smear results.

Billings Ovulation Method (BOM):

An NFP method in which the fertile days are identified exclusively by observations of cervical fluid at the vaginal opening. Developed by the Australian Drs. John and Evelyn Billings. An international survey in 1987 indicated that at least 50 million couples were using the method, and the number is said to be increasing from year to year. It has also been estimated that 80% of natural family planning world-wide is now the Billings ovulation method. In 1978 an international conference in Melbourne was attended by delegates from 48 countries. See also the cervical mucus method.

Creighton model ovulation method:

An NFP method of vaginal-cervical mucus self-evaluation according to criteria developed by Thomas Hilgers, M.D. at St. Louis and Creighton Universities. The criteria are called the vaginal discharge recording system (VDRS) and require that women check for the mucus by wiping the outside of their vaginas with bathroom tissue, checking the mucus for color, stretch and consistency. The last day of mucus that is either clear on appearance, stretches an inch or more, and/or causes the sensation of lubrication is called the peak mucus day. The method is similar to the Billings ovulation method.

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bioZhena’s method of monitoring the cervix:

And then we have the bioZhena method, with the Ovulona inserted briefly just like a tampon applicator, and taking a reading of the fertility status (most of the time NOT FERTILE = cannot conceive; only 3 days of fertility in each menstrual cycle):

Ovulona™

The DIU is or will be an auxiliary add-on

 

 How the Ovulona will be transformed into a (semi-) permanently worn cervical ring obviating daily insertion is shown in slide 4 of QUICK INTRO 4 SLIDES at

Friendly Technology and Next Generation Design

The natural interest of women in being in charge of their reproductive life leads to the possibility of using the information gathered in the process for additional medical purposes. The Ovulona cyclic profile is the signature of the menstrual-cycle vital sign, which is the result of the illustrated interaction between the female brain and the ovaries – the so-called Hypothalamus-Pituitary-Gonad Feedback Loop (F). (This editing added here in 2016.)

Menstrual cyclic profile signature of the HPG feedback mechanism

To enlarge the image, click https://biozhena.files.wordpress.com/2009/03/menstrual-cyclic-profile-signature-of-the-hpg-feedback-mechanism.jpg

The H-P-G feedback loop (F) gives rise to the menstrual cyclic profile signatures captured by the bioZhena technology.

Here is why the bioZhena technology had to be invented. One way of saying this is: The available means, methods or products, were not good enough. Another way of putting this is to quote from medical literature, as follows.

A symposium on ovulation prediction in the treatment of infertility covered all the phenomena known to be associated with ovulation [reference 9]. Moghissi, who discussed more than 20 measurable parameters that vary during the menstrual cycle, stated the following [reference 8]: “Mid-cycle mucorrhea, ferning, spinnbarkeit, lowered cell content, and viscosity of cervical mucus are used commonly in ovulation detection and as an index of the estrogenic response of cervical epithelium. However, these changes extend over several days … (These changes) do not necessarily indicate ovulation, and are merely an index of the optimal amount of circulating estrogen…”.

In brief, none of the methods determined ovulation with the required accuracy to be useful either as a conception aid or especially for birth control. Here is how our method (monitoring folliculogenesis) does it by generating the multi-featured cyclic profile that includes the definitive ovulation marker after the predictive signals, and here is how this compares with the older techniques. See how inaccurate is the ovulation assessment by the older means available to the users of NFP or FAM (spread over 3 days):

Marquette comparison with LH kit and Peak mucus – right click on the link to open a larger PDF version of the image.

Marquette comparison with LH kit and Peak mucus

In this example, our device detected delayed ovulation while the LH ovulation kit indicated positive for ovulation on two days (not just one) and the mucus assessment (Creighton method) indicated positive one day later. The LH was positive the day before as well as on the day of the ovulation marker (day 17), while the Peak mucus day indicated ovulation one day after the ovulation marker day.

The spread of 3 days is not acceptable, but it is actually quite typical of the uncertainty associated with these older techniques. You know what that means, don’t you, because you know that every day matters. Their lack of accuracy and precision renders the older techniques not good enough – which is where we started.

Cited references:

[8] Kamran S. Moghissi, “Cervical mucus changes and ovulation prediction and detection”, Journal of Reproductive Medicine 31 (Number 8), Supplement, 748 – 753, 1986.

[9] Stephen L. Corson, guest editor, “Ovulation Prediction in the Treatment of Infertility. A Symposium”, Journal of Reproductive Medicine 32 (Number 8), Supplement, 739, 1986.

Review and listen to 3 narrated slides summarizing the bioZhena technology. Contemplate the importance of the cervix uteri.

Infertility and A.R.T. or Assisted Reproductive Technologies

December 15, 2007

For these and other entries, see the Alphabet of bioZhena at

/2007/11/28/the-alphabet-of-biozhena/

 

 

Infertility:

Clinical infertility is the inability of a couple to achieve a pregnancy or to carry a pregnancy to term after one year of unprotected intercourse. If the difficulty to conceive lasts less than a year, the condition is referred to as reduced fertility or sub-fertility (see the previous post at /2007/12/14/sub-fertility-or-reduced-fertility/ ). Clinical infertility is classified further into male infertility, female infertility, couple infertility, and unexplained infertility. Studies have shown that in the past 50 years the quality and quantity of sperm has dropped by 42% and 50% respectively. In the past 20 years the decrease in sperm counts has occurred at a rate of 2% annually. For further information refer to Xeno-estrogens (see the Alphabet of bioZhena at /2007/11/28/the-alphabet-of-biozhena/ and the web reference therein).

In the U.S. alone, of the 6.7 million women with fertility problems in 1995, 42% had received some form of infertility services. The most common services were advice and diagnostic tests, medical help to prevent miscarriage, and drugs to induce ovulation [Fam. Plann. Perspect. 2000 May-Jun;32(3):132-7].

 

 

 

A Glossary of Infertility Terms and Acronyms published by the InterNational Council on Infertility Information Dissemination is available at http://www.inciid.org/glossary.html .

 

 

ART or Assisted Reproductive Technologies:

 

Also referred to sometimes colloquially as the “heroic procedures”, they are used to treat infertility patients. ART refers to all techniques involving direct retrieval of oocytes (eggs) from the ovary. They are: artificial insemination (AI), IVF (in vitro fertilization), TET (tubal embryo transfer), ZIFT (zygote intra-fallopian transfer), GIFT (gamete intra-fallopian transfer), ICSI (intra-cytoplasmic sperm injection), blastocyst transfer and other infertility treatments, such as IUI (intra-uterine insemination), assisted hatching (AZH), and immature oocyte maturation (IOM).

Web reference: http://www.ebiztechnet.com/cgi-bin/getit/links/Health/Reproductive_Health/Infertility/Education/Assisted_Reproductive_Technologies/

 

 

Sub-fertility or Reduced Fertility

December 14, 2007

For this and other entries, see the Alphabet of bioZhena at

/2007/11/28/the-alphabet-of-biozhena/

Subfertility (THE INITIAL TARGET OF BIOZHENA):

A state of less than normal fertility but not as bad as clinical infertility. Also called reduced fertility, it refers to the inability to conceive for more than about 4 months but not more than a year (which then becomes classified as clinical infertility, the inability to conceive after a year of unprotected intercourse). It is estimated that as many as one in six couples (17%) have difficulty in conceiving the number of children they want when they want them.

Again: Research suggests that between 14 and 17 percent of couples are affected by subfertility at some time during their reproductive lives. In fact, only eight out of 10 couples trying for a baby do get pregnant within 12 months. For approximately 10 percent of couples, pregnancy will still not have occurred after two years (clinical infertility). Sometimes the label of subfertility is used for couples who have had regular unprotected sexual intercourse for all of two years without conception taking place. This is a reflection of the fact that subfertility is becoming more and more commonplace.

According to one source ( http://www.womens-health.co.uk/ ), even for a healthy fertile couple, the ‘per month’ success rate (conception rate) is only around 15-20%, “so it is not at all uncommon to take some months to conceive”. Overall, around 70% of couples will have conceived by 6 months (a 30% subfertility rate). 85% conceive within 12 months (a 15% subfertility rate, “for the less impatient”). And 95% will be pregnant after 2 years of trying (technically, this is a conservatively estimated infertility rate of 5% – c.f. the 10% referenced above; or, this statistic might be perhaps considered the subfertility rate for the angelically patient). The monthly success rate in this population is 8%, and this statistic drops progressively as time goes on.

As for possible causes of difficulty to conceive, alcohol consumption, even in small amounts, can reduce a woman’s chance of conceiving by more than 50 percent, and smoking “…drastically reduced fertility in our sample”, as wrote a team from the Baltimore-based Health Care Financing Administration, in a report published in “Fertility and Sterility” (1998; 70: 632-637).

In terms of help, many people believe that fertility drugs, even when effective, remove conception from the intimate relationship between the partners, which means that it is to some extent beyond their control. Besides this loss of control, there are drawbacks and disadvantages to all forms of medically assisted conception. Some of them have potentially serious long-term effects. Consequently, many couples prefer to avoid these risks.

Women who describe overcoming infertility with the help of alternative therapists went to them because they had been offered drugs to induce ovulation but were reluctant to take them, when they learned of the possible side effects. Disturbing reports have appeared about the long-term as well as short-term effects of assisted conception. Increased miscarriage levels and premature and multiple births are not only very distressing but have considerable cost implications, both personally and societally (i.e., this is a public health issue). Babies born prematurely, or in multiple births, are at a disadvantage from the start. There are also some reports of increased rates of ovarian cancer in women who have taken fertility drugs, and of cancer in the babies of mothers who have had ovulation induced by drugs.

Subfertile couples are naturally interested in methods and tools that can help them to overcome the difficulty to conceive. The endocrinologist professor Brown may be quoted: “Failing to conceive when wanted is stressful and therefore favours infertility. It should be remembered that, apart from a few conditions such as blocked fallopian tubes, absent sperm and continued anovulation, most couples will conceive eventually without help. However, the modern expectation is one of immediate results, and the main function of assisted reproduction techniques is therefore to shorten the waiting time for conception.” To which we would add that bioZhena aims to offer a more affordable and safer alternative.

With the mentioned statistics of the fertile-age women suffering from the subfertility problem, this is a truly large opportunity in a constantly renewing and growing market. We are talking about 9 or 10 or even 18 million women in the USA alone – or quite possibly many more, taking into account all the impatience and demand for instant gratification in people today; plus about 50% of the 10 million of clinically infertile US couples, that is those who cannot afford the very costly ART treatments. [A.R.T. = Assisted Reproductive Technologies.]

This is the initial, early-stage, mission of bioZhena Corporation: To provide a definitive timing aid to couples experiencing difficulties in conceiving a baby. See also the entry for the Ovulona, where it is explained that, in this situation of reduced fertility, the basic problem is the proper timing of the intercourse.

 

BIOZHENA’S MISSION: A HEALTH TOOL FOR EVERY WOMAN

December 10, 2007

Far more than a tool to aid achieving and avoiding pregnancy

In the early years of the project, I published here a modestly formulated version of bioZhena’s vision statement. That was before a female OBGYN physician joined the team and together we broadened the vision and mission.

With the “Ambassador for the Vagina” it became plausible to fully explore the broad applicability of the technology, and to plan pregnancy monitoring and the transformation of the daily-inserted Ovulona into the semi-permanently worn telemetric cervical ring version that Kim the OBGYN named the Halo™.

Friendly Technology - with cervical ring & Ovulograph

For healthcare providers the Ovulograph™, and the Halo™ cervical ring for all women

Our vision is to create a product that practically every woman will want to use. The woman of the 21st century is envisaged to become accustomed to using her daily Ovulona and/or Halo self-check about as routinely as she is using her toothbrush.

It is pertinent to note that a May 2017 Human Factors in Computing Systems study found that the smartphone apps that track menstrual cycles “often disappoint users with a lack of accuracy… and an emphasis on pink and flowery form over function and customization”. Significantly, too, “teenage girls were relying on smartphone apps as their primary form of birth control”. Such evidence indicates that the market is primed for the bioZhena technology breakthrough.

The Ovulona™/Halo™ will be useful to the point of becoming an essential tool of women’s health management, both at home and, when appropriate, via the Ovulograph™, for the provider in the doctor’s office – and for the payer, too. Accordingly, the Ovulona will be supremely user-friendly and affordable for everyone.

See and listen to the slides in the link at the end of the post.

The Ovulona personal fertility status self-diagnosis device

 What is folliculogenesis - like EKG

Applications of cervical sensor girl w. device and other solutions - panorama1

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Go to New mostly narrated slides 2017

Slide show takes a few moments to open

The Elevator: Swiss VC/PE deal-maker offers bioZhena to their investors

December 7, 2007

The Elevator, “The Magazine for a Wealth of Opportunity”, December 2007

 

This post is about the integral and unavoidable aspect of project development – seeking development capital. The title could conceivably read “From Switzerland With Love”, if a play on words were intended. Such as the name of The Elevator magazine is a reference to the phrase “elevator pitch”, a standard concept in the venture capital/private equity arena (meaning a very brief introductory pitch of the investment proposition; The Elevator articles are naturally somewhat more extensive than that).

The editor of The Elevator reviewed and published bioZhena after we responded to their invitation, “Seeking Deals to Fund”, http://www.linkedin.com/pub/0/456/786 .

The Elevator (“The Magazine for a Wealth of Opportunity”) is an impressively produced electronic magazine, attached. On page 3, the editor writes: “…since our first issue in March 2006 we have reviewed over 300 projects and retained 60 of them as features. More than 10,000 individuals have seen The €levator ; we’ve had a great diversity of projects, much interest and several deals closed over the past 12 months. … I invite all our readers to become active members of our investor’s forum …“.

On page 35 appears the following claim: OUR TEAM OF EXPERTS PROVIDES ACCESS TO THE BEST SOLUTIONS IN PRIVATE EQUITY, ASSET MANAGEMENT AND VIP ADVISORY.

Here are the headlines from the magazine’s title page, featuring a partial list of contents, and bioZhena is one of these featured listings:

  • How to open your own fund. An introduction by the experts of JP Fund Services
  • bioZhena. The turnkey technology for birth control
  • VentureLab. The professional matching platform
  • The Village Barbados. Prime Luxury Retreat seeking USD 31 million

The interesting thing about this presentation of bioZhena, by the Geneva-area international business VC/PE deal-maker, is their risk scale. We see a scale with 6 colors, from green and light green, through yellow, then light pink and dark pink, and finally the highest risk level is red.

The editor indicates the risk level of the bioZhena proposition as between light green and yellow (or level 4 on a scale of 1 to 11). This is the same as that of the real estate deal “The Village Barbados”, and it is better than the level 5 [yellow] risk level of the VentureLab deal, and it compares favorably with the various other listings in this December issue of the Elevator. Only the Yacht Club Mediterranean and the Castellan, New York real estate deals are assessed with lower risk levels, 2 and 1 respectively.

It is also interesting that bioZhena’s risk level is assessed the same as that of DealFlow, Toronto – “a television series that captures the drama and sport of global business as seen through the eayes of dealmakers”. DealFlow “is currently seeking US$620,000 in a US$875,000 Private Placement Offering of Convertible Preferred shares at US$20.00 per share”.

bioZhena’s investment opportunity is described as follows:

Investment Volume: Up to $ 15 Million (current Offering for $3M plus 1-year $3M Warrant)

Est. Return on Investment: 100%+

Est. Duration: Approx. 3 Years

Minimum Investment: $250,000 or a portion thereof at Company’s discretion

 

Ref.:

The Elevator, “The Magazine for a Wealth of Opportunity”, December 2007

Regarding fetal sex preselection

December 2, 2007

Ovulona(TM) and bioZhena Corporation logo

A new friend, interested in the bioZhena technology and venture proposition, has written to me:

“One question that I’ve gotten is around the accuracy of sex selection. I know this is (or can be) a controversial subject. My wife and I (parents of 3 boys) tried using one of the methods in a book to have a girl on our second try. It didn’t work, obviously, and our son decided to come on his own. Could you please tell me more about that part of the test. I understand it in theory but probably it will need to go into clinicals to validate the claim – right?”

I responded fairly promptly, but without details such as the references and especially some graphics, and without expressing serious doubt about my friend’s book and the advice they had drawn from it. This was my response:

Of course, sex preselection is a controversial subject. Most important, though, is that you understand that this is not our initial product offering; it is merely a well justified expectation (speculation), which requires a study and investment, just like the early cervical cancer diagnosis as well as the birth control uses of the Ovulona technology.

What we have for immediate market introduction is the Ovulona as a tool for aiding conception, as previously passed by the FDA, and that did not include any fetal sexing claims.

[NFP = Natural Family Planning; FAM = Fertility Awareness Method]

We will introduce SFP, Scientific Family Planning. SFA, Scientific Fertility Awareness. All four ™-designated.

For your immediate understanding of this particular fetal sexing implications of the bioZhena technology, you presumably are aware of slide 4. Now I summarize for you where this comes from. Namely, I paraphrase from a detailed white paper, which is available for study upon request, if interested:

…a 1992 publication by John T. France et al., reporting data from 55 pregnancies (and births). The study was based on data whereby only one coitus per fertile period occurred, and three different markers were used to estimate the time of ovulation.

The stringency of the study design by France et al. went so far as to exclude 29% of pregnancies from the birth sex ratio evaluation in terms of timing of conception with respect to ovulation, because of more than one act of intercourse during the fertile period. Significantly, the birth sex ratio was 0.50 for this excluded group but far from 0.50 for the good study population.

The results of the France et al. study were as follows: Of the 34 male infants born, 65% were conceived 2 to 5 days before ovulation, and 71% of the born girls were conceived from intercourse timed between 1 day before to 1 day after the estimated time of ovulation. However, there was a great uncertainty about the actual ovulation day because in only 9% of the cases did the three ovulation markers agree with each other. In 68% of the cycles, agreement was within +/-1 day. The peak cervical mucus marker was one while the other two markers were the onset of the LH surge, and the basal body temperature rise.

Hoping that this mildly specialist language is not just mumbo jumbo to you, the key to this is your understanding that until the emergence of our device there has not been a definitive tool for this; that is, not only predicting but also detecting ovulation – and everything else follows from this simple fact.

The France et al. study was the best, better than some others, but even France et al. did not do everything right. For example, John France was not able to share those 9% of cases where the three methods, which they wisely used (to make up for the absence of a definitive tool), coincided in terms of the day of ovulation. Those 9% could have given us a better, almost definitive baseline. (5 definitive cases, if coincidence of three unreliable methods amounts to definitiveness. 5 = 9% of 55.)

K., this slip into details has been due to your scientific education and the personal level of your prior involvement with the subject, which presumably makes for an appreciation not necessarily to be found elsewhere, in other people.

Having quoted the question and answer verbatim, my next post will attempt to improve the answer (the answer to what may well be a burning question in numerous minds) with the illustrations and explanations. That is: Fetal sex preselection – illustrated . Check it out!

References

France et al. paper with data on fetal sex pre-selection, 3-day fertile window:

J.T. France, F.M. Graham, L. Gosling, P. Hair and B.S. Knox, “Characteristics of natural conception cycles occurring in a prospective study of sex preselection: fertility awareness symptoms, hormone levels, sperm survival, and pregnancy outcome”, International Journal of Fertility 37 (4), 224 – 255, 1992.

NIH paper:

A.J. Wilcox, C.R. Weinberg and D.D. Berg, “Timing of sexual intercourse in relation to ovulation. Effects on the probability of conception, survival of the pregnancy, and sex of the baby”, New England Journal of Medicine 333, 1517 – 1521, 1995.

Hodgen et al. paper on different survival times of X and Y sperm:

Q. Van Dyk, M. C. Mahony and G. D. Hodgen, “Differential binding of X- and Y-chromosome-bearing human spermatozoa to zona pellucida in vitro”, Andrologia, Volume 33, Issue 4, Page 199, July 2001

The Alphabet of bioZhena — Abeceda bioŽeny

November 28, 2007

THE ALPHABET OF BIOZHENA WITH CLICKABLE TABLE OF CONTENTS

The Alphabet of bioZhena

A glossary of biomedical terms for bioZhena Corporation

Ovulona and logo

The glossary-and-primer of bioZhena is attached; click on one of the links above.

The glossary is just that! For more details with illustrations and more substantial treatment of certain topics, please go to the the blog, starting perhaps with the Table of Contents . Or try one of the two About pages – one about the blogger and the issues covered here , and the other About bioZhena – tech pitch . See if both these pages include the link to a quick pictorial summary of the bioZhena project, called Tweetroducing bioZhena in 8 slides !

In THE ALPHABET we expand on – and explain the meaning of – the one brief sentence: We have invented the new technology of ovulography™, fundamental to women’s health and lifestyle.

Ovulography is bioZhena’s proprietary technology for monitoring folliculogenesis in vivo. To tell the woman user, which are the three days when she can become pregnant (and the rest of the month when she cannot). And there is more, much more, which is what THE ALPHABET OF BIOZHENA is about. As is the whole of bioZhena’s Weblog .

This glossary/primer of bioZhena Corporation is no Alphabet of Ben Sira — an anonymous work, which has been dated anywhere from the seventh to the eleventh century, and which tells the story of the conception, birth, and early education of the prophet Ben Sira.

There were twenty-two stories (mimicking the twenty-two letters of the Hebrew alphabet) to answer the questions posed by the Babylonian king Nebuchadnezzar. Apart from being notable for the story of Lilith, the primordial first wife of Adam, what makes this ancient text particularly unique and fascinating is its irreverent tone …And, we get to learn of the angels who are in charge of medicine: Snvi, Snsvi, and Smnglof!

For more information on the ancient and irreverent Alphabet of Ben Sira, go to http://www.google.com/search?q=Alphabet%20of%20Ben%20Sira !

Lilith from Michelangelo’s The Temptation of Adam and Eve

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And now, as the ancients would say, remotum joco (roughly, “joking aside”):

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A simple description and pictorial representation of the female reproductive organs is available at the American Medical Association’s web site “Atlas of the Body: Female Reproductive Organs”: http://www.medem.com/MedLb/article_detaillb.cfm?article_ID=ZZZ8QKJ56JC&sub_cat=2

A more detailed treatment of Sexual Reproduction in Humans is given in http://www.ultranet.com/~jkimball/BiologyPages/S/Sexual_Reproduction.html

For a particularly enjoyable, stimulating and informative source on the intimate geography of womanhood, reach for Natalie Angier’s Pulitzer Prize winning book “Woman – An Intimate Geography”, Houghton Mifflin Company, 1999, ISBN 0-395-69130-3. An excellent background read for the appreciation of bioZhena. But read Mysterious conceptions, under M.

For all that, go to one of the attached files: The Alphabet of bioZhena in PDF format. THE ALPHABET OF BIOZHENA WITH CLICKABLE TABLE OF CONTENTS is more convenient than the PDF version that does not have the clickable table of contents.


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